I sat, waiting for the connecting flight to Cleveland, listening to something on my iPhone and tooling around on my Macbook Air.  I felt a tension in my chest when I looked around at all the people doing something similar including overly-loud-ichat-user, annoying-physics-game-on-iphone-kid, and semi-staged I-point-at-your-macbook-screen-you-point-at-mine-couple.   I wanted to rise from my chair and yell “I am comfortable in a command line, I run 2 flavors of linux, and manage 3 dedicated windows servers.  I know some C++ and non-Apple devices outnumber Apple devices 2 to 1 in my home.  I’m not one of you!”  My scream would not be blocked out by the shitty white standard iPod earbuds, and no one would be quick enough to capture it on their iOS devices nor record it with their iSight cameras.  Steve recommended I put that line on a t-shirt.

I’m going to buy an Android phone and compile a copy of Darwin to return harmony to my technological soul.

I found the following in an Economist.com article on why kids can’t read:

No question, without a wimpy GUI, computers would never have become as popular as they are today. The command-line interface—with its forbidding prompt and blinking cursor—required mastering a whole catechism of arcane instructions that only a priesthood of computerdom could cherish.

When “root@computername:~# shutdown -h now” could be replaced by a simple click of a mouse to switch off a computer, novices of all ages and backgrounds could climb aboard the digital bandwagon.

via Economist.com 

I found the following in an Economist.com article on why kids can’t read:

No question, without a wimpy GUI, computers would never have become as popular as they are today. The command-line interface—with its forbidding prompt and blinking cursor—required mastering a whole catechism of arcane instructions that only a priesthood of computerdom could cherish.

When “root@computername:~# shutdown -h now” could be replaced by a simple click of a mouse to switch off a computer, novices of all ages and backgrounds could climb aboard the digital bandwagon.

via Economist.com